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Project Outline

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 6 months ago

Return to Sarah's Page

 

 

My Links

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

ISTE NETS*S

 

Design a Conceptual Framework

The following prompts will help you define the conception framework of your project.

 

For individuals: Reflect on this series of questions and record your responses on your own wiki page. Be ready to share at your next team meeting. Don’t become too wedded to your ideas yet.

For a group: When you meet, share and discuss your individual responses, then respond to the questions again together. If you aim for a collaborative project, try to “mash up” your efforts into one shared project idea.

 

 

1. What important and enduring concepts are fundamental to each subject you teach? List them. Try to limit the list to two to three big concepts for each subject. Refer to content standards you teach to determine those covered by these big “umbrella” concepts. 

 Reading:

       Find, understand, and use specific information in a variety of texts across the subject areas to perform a task.

       Examine content and structure of grade-level informational text across the subject areas.

       Listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of informational and narrative text across the subject areas at school and on own, applying comprehension strategies as needed.

 

Writing:

       Investigate topics of interest and importance across the subject areas, selecting appropriate media sources, using effective research processes, and demonstrating ethical use of resources and materials.

       Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, essays, short stories, poems, research reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience and purpose across the subject areas.

       Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas, including relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to audience and purpose that engage reader interest ; organize information in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas, sentences, and paragraphs ; and use precise words and fluent sentence structures that support meaning.

 

Math:

       Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.

       Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data.

       Select, apply, and translate among mathematical representations to solve problems.

 

Social Science:

      Understand participatory responsibilities of citizens in the community (voluntarism) and in the political process (becoming informed about public issues and candidates, joining political parties/interest groups/associations, communicating with public officials, voting, influencing lawmaking through such processes as petitions/initiatives).

    Demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to make reasoned and responsible financial decisions as a consumer, producer, saver, and investor in a market economy.

    Analyze the causes of human migration (e.g., density, food and water supply, transportation and communication systems) and its effects (e.g., impact on physical and human systems).

    Understand how differing points of view, self-interest, and global distribution of natural resources play a role in conflict over territory.

Identify and analyze cause and effect relationships in history.

 

2. Why do these concepts matter? Why are they important?

 These concepts are important because they are essential for understanding the systems and the interactions between humankind and the world. Theses concepts are also important because they provide students with opportunites to practice skills they will need in order to function successfully in our world. Students who have experience with these skills well have deveoped the ability to critically analyze their world based on interpretation of data, either collected by themselves or retrieved from a reliable source.

 

3. Outside of school, who cares about these topics? What is their relevance in different people’s lives and in different parts of the world?

 These topics are significant to a plethera of people.

Reading:

In order for students to become funtional citizens of our society it is essential they are able to comprehend literature of various forms. In addition, they will be expected to read literature in order to learn and perform tasks in thier private and career lives.

 

Writing:

The writing concepts stated above are essential to master in order to respectfully communicate your ideas in a way that inspires others to listen or take notice.

 

Math:

The concepts listed regarding mathematics are significant because they provide students with the constructs to be able to critically analyze their world through a process of asking questions, determining a way to collect data, and finally analyzing the data to make inferences and predictions. Overall, these concepts provide students with opportunites to develop skills that allow them to become problem solvers in today's complex world.

 

Social Science:

These concepts are the most significant to me. They comprise what it means to be living as a citizen of the United States in a global community with various values that have formed through the accumulation of experiences. These concepts provided students with a construct to understand and participate responsible in this developed society.

 

I have decided that my question is:

 

Why is independence significant to our society?

 

This idea or concept is important to people who are being oppressed in some way who are looking for independence and freedom.

 

4. Select one or two of the most promising of these topics and think about real-to-life contexts to answer: What are the interdisciplinary connections? What other subjects might be incorporated?

I am going to focus on:

Analyze the causes of human migration (e.g., density, food and water supply, transportation and communication systems) and its effects (e.g., impact on physical and human systems).

Identify and analyze cause and effect relationships in history.

Understand the impact of individuals through the period of the American Revolution, on ideas, ways of life, or the course of events in U.S. history.

 

I would like to have my students answer the question, "Why is independence significant in today's society?" We will look at that question first through the history of the American Revolution.

 

Interdisciplinary connections include:

Reading:

       Find, understand, and use specific information in a variety of texts across the subject areas to perform a task.

       Examine content and structure of grade-level informational text across the subject areas.

       Listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of informational and narrative text across the subject areas at school and on own, applying comprehension strategies as needed.

 

Writing:

       Investigate topics of interest and importance across the subject areas, selecting appropriate media sources, using effective research processes, and demonstrating ethical use of resources and materials.

       Write narrative, expository, and persuasive texts, using a variety of written forms—including journals, essays, short stories, poems, research reports, research papers, business and technical writing—to express ideas appropriate to audience and purpose across the subject areas.

       Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas, including relevant examples, facts, anecdotes, and details appropriate to audience and purpose that engage reader interest; organize information in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas, sentences, and paragraphs ; and use precise words and fluent sentence structures that support meaning.

 

 

5. As you begin to imagine working with these topics, how might you push past rote learning into analysis, evaluation and creation? Incorporate Bloom’s “rigor” verbs in your answer.

 

The question, "Why is freedom significant to our society?" is going to broken down into three more specific areas of study: Who seeks freedom from what? What is the cost to obtain freedom? What are the responsibilities of having freedom?

 

I will have students compare many groups quest for freedom. The will link the commonalites and differences of their quests. They will make hypothesis about future and currents quests for freedom. They will (maybe, still contemplating final project) design and construct a guide to freedom decsribing the former three questions. They will publish thier product in a medium of thier choosing (ex: blog, website, video, podcast, digital story, etc.).

 

As my project become more clear I will add to and further refine these tasks.

 

6. Imagine authentic ways students might engage in this topics within a project and the ways 21st century skills might be addressed. Hint: The terms collaboration, digital tools, and information literacy could appear in your answer!

 

Comparing the quest for freedom among different groups of people of the past, the present, and the future to determine commonalities and differences. I would also try to engage them through testimony of persons having fought for such freedoms through video conferencing and presentations.

Students will collaborate in groups to put together a freedom guide discussing the former three questions, supporting there statements through research. They will use digital tools to research information, create a system for organization of information, and ultimately create a guide to freedom.

 

 

7. What aspects of these topics will interest your students? (A feature that seems superficial or tangential but fascinates students can give you entrée into more essential matters, so brainstorm as many as you can.)

Student choice

Collaboration

Digital creative freedom

Teamwork

Self and evaluation

Relates to today's issues and issue that could pertain to them in the future

Responisibility of providing accurate information

History

Digital tools

Presentation and publication of work

 

8. What learning dispositions should you cultivate and ask your students to pay attention to? (REINV p. 51-52)

 

Curiosity

Resourcefulness

Cooperation

Motivation

Contribution

Responsibility

Integrity

Pride

 

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